Did Dietary Changes Bring Us 'F' Words? Study Tackles Complexities of Language's Origins

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Did Dietary Changes Bring Us 'F' Words? Study Tackles Complexities of Language's Origins New York Times

Thousands of years ago, some of our ancestors left behind the hunter-gatherer lifestyle and started to settle down. They grew vegetables and grains for stews or porridge, kept cows for milk and turned it into cheese, and shaped clay into storage pots. Had they ...

Mind Your “Fs” and “Vs”: Agriculture May Have Shaped Both Human Jaws and Language Scientific American

The organs of speech are the same for all people, or so linguists have typically assumed. But it turns out that may not be true—in fact, what you eat can change how you talk. The conventional wisdom held in the field of historical linguistics is the vocal ...

Did Cooking Really Give Us The F-Word? NPR

Processed foods get blamed for a lot of things. But this week, a group of linguists took it to a whole new level. To put it crudely, they argue that the invention of processed foods like yogurt and gruel thousands of years ago gave us the F-word. Lots of F-words.

Ancestral Diet Changes Might Have Given Us the 'F' Word, Study Finds Geek

The difference between a Paleolithic edge-to-edge bite (left) and a modern overbite/overjet bite (right). (Photo Credit: Tímea Bodogán/University of Zurich). Stay on target. Bear Family Relocated From 'Highway Median Den' in Massachusetts · New Astronaut ...

We Can Thank Agriculture and Soft Food for the 'F' Word, Claims Provocative New Study Gizmodo

Humans couldn't always easily produce “f” and “v” sounds, according to a surprising new study. The reason we can now enjoy words like “flavor” and “effervescent,” say the researchers, has to do with changes to the ancestral human diet and the introduction ...

Human sound systems are shaped by post-Neolithic changes in bite configuration Science Magazine

In 1985, the linguist Charles Hockett proposed that the use of teeth and jaws as tools in hunter-gatherer populations makes consonants produced with lower lip and upper teeth (“f” and “v” sounds) hard to produce. He thus conjectured that these sounds were ...

Ancient switch to soft food gave us an overbite—and the ability to pronounce 'f's and 'v's Science Magazine

Don't like the F-word? Blame farmers and soft food. When humans switched to processed foods after the spread of agriculture, they put less wear and tear on their teeth. That changed the growth of their jaws, giving adults the overbites normal in children.

The rise of farming altered our bite and changed how people talk Science News

Humankind's gift of gab is not set in stone, and farming could help to explain why. Over the last 6,000 years or so, farming societies increasingly have substituted processed dairy and grain products for tougher-to-chew game meat and wild plants common in ...

Human speech sounds evolved because of our diet, study says CNN

(CNN) Although languages around the world vary greatly, some share similar speech sounds. A new study suggests that labiodental sounds like "f" and "v" are included in about half of the world's languages due to a change in our diet that relies on softer ...

Shara E Bailey - Arts & Science - NYU Arts & Science - NYU

Bailey SE, Benazzi S, Buti L, Hublin J-J. (2016) Allometry, merism, and tooth shape of the lower deciduous M2 and permanent M1.Am J Phys Anthropol. 159:93- ...

Steven Moran - UZH - Institut für Vergleichende Sprachwissenschaft UZH - Institut für Vergleichende Sprachwissenschaft - UZH

I am a scientist trained in computational linguistics, linguistic fieldwork, and language teaching. My research focuses on the evolution of the phonological system ...

UZH - Department of Comparative Linguistics UZH

Probabilities of assigning the same case maker to the sole argument of 1-place predicates ("S") and the most agent-like argument of 2- and 3-place predicates ...

Alan C. L. Yu | Department of Linguistics Department of Linguistics - University of Chicago

Alan C. L. Yu is Professor of Linguistics. He is also the director of the Phonology Laboratory and the principal investigator of the Washo Documentation Project.

The Ability to Pronounce “F” and “V” Sounds Might Have Evolved Along With Diet Smithsonian

“French fries” might not be on the menu if not for ancient farmers, and not because we can now grow plenty of potatoes, but because it would be harder to enunciate the f sounds needed to order them. The ability to make labiodental sounds—which are sounds ...

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