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Trump Administration Scrutinizes Fetal Tissue Research

Science advocacy groups seek to make facts on research clear as Department of Health and Human Services conducts comprehensive review of research following pressure from conservatives. Read more

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Children with ADHD or autism could be early indicator for younger siblings ...

Credit: Florida International University Younger siblings of children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) or autism spectrum disorder are more likely to develop either disorder, according to a new study. According to the findings ... Read more

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The Soy Sauce Colon Cleanse That Left a Woman Brain Dead Shows How Dangerous ...

Another day, another horrible-for-you health fad gone viral. Something called the soy sauce colon cleanse is making headlines. The extremely dangerous fad reportedly left one woman brain dead, reminding us just how dangerous viral trends like this one ... Read more

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Breakthrough breast cancer drug cleared for use in Scotland

More than 400 women a year are expected to benefit from the decision. However, campaigners have demanded the drug now be offered to those with incurable breast cancer. Perjeta, also known by its generic name pertuzumab, can give women with ... Read more

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Let's kill off this mumbo jumbo about vaccines, demands STEPHEN POLLARD

IT is horrific to lose a child in any circumstances. But imagine the torment of losing a child while you are pregnant – and knowing that it could have been avoided. If you are pregnant and refuse to have the flu vaccine, that is the gamble you are taking. Read more

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Dublin-based doctors make worldwide breakthrough in epilepsy treatment

Researchers at the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland (RCSI) collaborated with researchers in 17 other countries as part of the major international study. The study involved the comparison of the DNA of over 15,000 people who have epilepsy versus ... Read more

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Scientists develop 10-minute cancer test

Scientists have developed a 10-minute cancer test with a 90 per cent success rate. The new approach uncovers traces of the disease in a patient's bloodstream. The cheap and simple test uses a color-changing fluid to reveal the presence of malignant ... Read more

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Disrupting Reproduction: Two New Advances in Tech-Assisted Baby-Making

Last week, news of CRISPR-engineered babies launched a firestorm of debate on the future of human reproduction: Is it safe? Is it ethical? Do we now have the ability to “play God”? But even as scientists, ethicists, and the general public struggled ... Read more

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Alcohol abuse on the rise in Singapore, according to mental health study

A wide-ranging study on the state of mental health in Singapore found that more people are suffering from alcohol abuse, compared with a similar study done in 2010. The proportion of people in Singapore who suffered from alcohol abuse rose to 4.1 per ... Read more

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Diabetes doubles risk for heart failure

by TG. An analysis of health records of the whole Scottish population aged ≥30 years revealed that people with diabetes have an increased risk for heart failure. Recent clinical trials of new glucose-lowering treatments have drawn attention to the ... Read more

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Heart attack symptoms every woman needs to know - and some are surprising

Although around 70 women die from a heart attack every day, not all of us know that signs and symptoms can differ for men and women. Share. Comments. By. Robyn DarbyshireAudience Writer. 13:06, 11 DEC 2018. Lifestyle. Women don't always have chest ... Read more

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How family holidays help with children's mental and emotional development

According to research, experiential gifts (like travelling) have more of an impact on a child's mental development than material gifts. Holidays are not only fun and relaxing, they also help your child become smarter, build a stronger emotional ... Read more

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Fish study prompts call for closer look at depression drug's hereditary effects

Biologists at the University of Ottawa have discovered exposing fish embryos to Prozac affected the aquatic creatures' ability to manage stress for generations, prompting a call for further research into the lasting effects of antidepressants on humans. Read more

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Stop Overdoses PA, Get Help Now

(WBRE/WYOU-TV) While there's plenty of reason to celebrate the holiday season Health officials are reminding people that the season also brings with it an increased risk of overdose. But this week an initiative is being launched that officials hope ... Read more

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How does critical illness impact our microbiomes?

New research published in Respiratory Research examined microbiota in lung, stomach and fecal samples of critically ill patients, finding reduced microbial diversity to reflect high illness severity and an association with mortality. Here to talk about ... Read more

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Fostering synergies and strengthening joint efforts to fight AMR

The European Joint Action on antimicrobial resistance and health-care associated infections established by the new European One Health Action Plan against AMR aims to foster synergies across AMR- related activities and policy developments among EU ... Read more

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Alzheimer's could be diagnosed long before symptoms appear

Scientists have developed a blood test that can accurately diagnose or even predict Alzheimer's disease before symptoms appear. Currently the only way to definitively diagnose Alzheimer's disease in life is through brain scans and tests of ... Read more

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New study to examine impact screen time has on kids' brains

SEATTLE - A groundbreaking new study about the impact of screen time on adolescent brains has many parents thinking. The study is being conducted by the National Institutes of Health (NIH). It's called The Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) ... Read more

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Neurotransmitter-affecting medicines used in pregnancy not linked to autism ...

The authors of a study into the use of medicines that affect neurotransmitters in pregnant women have found no link to autism risk in offspring. Maternal use of medicines targeting neurotransmitter systems is unlikely to directly affect the risk of ... Read more

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PredictImmune's first prognostic test, PredictSURE IBD™, set for UK and ...

CAMBRIDGE, England--(BUSINESS WIRE)--PredictImmune, developers of pioneering prognostic tools for guiding treatment options and improving patient outcomes in immune-mediated diseases, today announced CE IVD (European Conformity In-Vitro ... Read more

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Holiday hospitalization carries higher risks, study says

(CNN) Research has shown that going to the hospital in July or over the weekend can be riskier for patients because of factors such as medical errors, understaffing or staff fatigue. The holiday period can also be added to the list, according to a new ... Read more

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Scientists Turn Wasp Venom Into Potentially Groundbreaking Antibiotic

Decades of antibiotic overuse have bread new generations of super-bacteria that can go on living even when hit with the most potent drugs we've got. Scientists are scrambling to discover new antibiotic compounds, but it's slow going. Oh, there are ... Read more

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Woman's fatal brain-eating infection linked to tap water

People will try just about anything to combat a bad case of the sniffles. Whether it's from a cold or allergies, a runny or stuffy nose is incredibly annoying, and one of the at-home treatments that's gained traction in recent years is the use of a ... Read more

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Spray-on gel could help fight cancer after surgery

Cancer recurrence after surgical resection remains a major problem. Now a team of scientists from UCLA have created a biodegradable spray gel that could help the body fight off cancer after surgery and stop it from spreading to other parts of the body. Read more

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PCI in Cancer; Beta-Blocker Prophylaxis; Stress Echo Predicts Cancer Deaths

New studies in cardio-oncology focus in on percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for cancer patients, a strategy to cut trastuzumab (Herceptin) heart risk, and an exercise echocardiography study that shines light on cancer-related mortality. Cancer ... Read more

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HEALTH, NATURALLY: Consider side effects with prescriptions

New research has found that metformin, the most commonly used medication for treating diabetes, lowers vitamin B12 levels. This is a significant finding because while diabetics can develop peripheral neuropathy, being deficient in vitamin B12 increases ... Read more

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Researchers say coffee may combat two devastating brain diseases

The past few years have brought lots of good news for anyone who considers coffee a vice. Scientists have discovered that various compounds in coffee can help fight a number of diseases including Alzheimer's, and now a new study is putting even more ... Read more

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10 of the most important things we learned about mental health this year

Approximately one in five adults in the US — 43.8 million — experiences mental illness in a given year, according to The National Alliance on Mental Illness. That being said, it's no surprise that each and every year researchers put time and enormous ... Read more

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Hangover Anxiety: This Personality Trait Makes You More Likely to Suffer ...

Very shy people are more likely to suffer from anxiety caused by drinking than those who are more extroverted, according to a study. A portmanteau of “anxiety” and “hangover,” “hangxiety” describes the state of distress some people feel after drinking ... Read more

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Genetic changes associated with physical activity reported

Time spent sitting, sleeping and moving is determined in part by our genes, University of Oxford researchers have shown. In one of the most detailed projects of its kind, the scientists studied the activity of 91,105 UK Biobank participants who had ... Read more

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What Happens in Our Brain When We Are Yelled At?

Sight and hearing are the two main sensory modalities allowing us to interact with our environment. But what happens within the brain when it perceives a threatening signal, such as an aggressive voice? How does it distinguish a threatening voice from ... Read more

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Boy dies after getting electrocuted by wearing headphones while charging

NEW DELHI: In another gadget-related accident, a 16-year-old boy in Malaysia died after getting electrocuted by headphones while they were being charged. According to a report by New Straits Times, the incident took place in Kampung Gaing Baru Pedas, ... Read more

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Inflammatory Bowel Disease: How To Obtain An Animal Model That Resembles The ...

Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) are the two main types of an autoimmune disease called Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD). Since the beginning of the 21st century, IBD has become a global disease with an increasing incidence in ... Read more

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Dates, Apricots Better Than Starchy Foods In Lowering Diabetes, Say Experts

As per the study published in the journal Nutrition and Diabetes, adding dried fruits such as dates, apricots, raisins and sultanas to your daily diet may not spike your blood sugar levels, as compared to starchy foods such as white bread. Experts ... Read more

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A Code for Reprogramming Immune Sentinels

For the first time, a research team at Lund University in Sweden has successfully reprogrammed mouse and human skin cells into immune cells called dendritic cells. The process is quick and effective, representing a pioneering contribution for applying ... Read more

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Global coalition backs Imperial College London's RNA vaccine platform to fight ...

One of the first missions that the Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations (CEPI) set when it came into being in 2017 was to facilitate development of vaccine platforms that can be quickly adopted against unknown pathogens. Now, it is shelling ... Read more

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Editing consciousness: How bereaved people control their thoughts without ...

Date: December 10, 2018; Source: Columbia University School of Engineering and Applied Science; Summary: A new study shows that avoidant grievers unconsciously monitor and block the contents of their mind-wandering, a discovery that could lead to ... Read more

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Poo transplants: which bacteria work to treat a type of inflammatory bowel ...

Fecal microbiota transplantation – or poo transplants – can be an effective treatment for gut conditions. Now, UNSW Sydney medical researchers and collaborators from Australia and the US have shown which bacteria work best. shutterstock_647537386.jpg. Read more

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Holiday hospitalization carries higher risks, study says

(CNN) Research has shown that going to the hospital in July or over the weekend can be riskier for patients because of factors such as medical errors, understaffing or staff fatigue. The holiday period can also be added to the list, according to a new ... Read more

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Measles: Vaccine available Tuesday at Palisades Center

Health officials Tuesdaywill be giving out free measles, mumps, rubella (MMR) vaccines to residents at the Palisades Center. There are currently 91 measles cases in the county and eight under investigation, and officials said the Best Buy at the ... Read more

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Doctors acquitted of lazy people, but there are nuances

The time we spend on leisure, sleep and physical activity, partly determined by our genes. This is the conclusion reached by researchers from the University of Oxford after studying weekly activities of the 200 members of the British Biobank, reports ... Read more

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How to Keep Weight Off Over Christmas: Scientists Reveal 10 Tips

Maybe it was that slab of gravy-laden turkey on Thanksgiving that started it all, or perhaps the handful of spiced festive cookies a colleague passed around at work, but as January 1 rolls around it's as clear as day: you've put on holiday weight (again). Read more

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Breast cancer drug finally backed and available through NHS in Scotland

A BREAST cancer drug is to be made available to patients on the NHS in Scotland after being rejected three times. 0 comment. The Scottish Medicines Consortium (SMC), the body which approves drugs for use by the health service, previously rejected ... Read more

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Tracer Molecule Identified to Detect Tau Proteins, Alzheimer 's Disease in the ...

A newly found molecule could light up the tau proteins long associated with neurodegenerative diseases, giving doctors a new tool to diagnose Alzheimer's disease. In a pair of studies a team from Johns Hopkins Medicine have found new radioactive trace ... Read more

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Almost 8000 islanders added to national organ donation list after data delay

Thousands of islanders from Jersey have been added to the national organ donation list after a three year delay in transferring data. Between 2015 and October this year, Jersey drivers were able to opt-in to register as an organ donor through their ... Read more

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Ohio Mesothelioma Victims Center Now Offers A Person With Mesothelioma or a ...

The Ohio Mesothelioma Victims Center is a passionate advocate about making certain a person with mesothelioma or asbestos exposure lung cancer anywhere in Oho receives the very best financial compensation and their services are free." WASHINGTON ... Read more

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AIDSfree: Kenya's Condom King and his mission to combat HIV taboos

When Stanley Ngara started teaching young Kenyans about safe sex he found many of those present too embarrassed to listen to his message on how they could avoid catching HIV. Condoms were linked in their mind to prostitution. Having grown up in ... Read more

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Herpes simplex: Everything you need to know

Herpes simplex is a viral infection that typically affects the mouth, genitals, or anal area. It is contagious and can cause outbreaks of sores and other symptoms. Herpes simplex virus (HSV) is a highly prevalent infection globally, with the most ... Read more

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Dialysis patients at risk of progressive brain injury

Kidney dialysis can cause short-term 'cerebral stunning' and may be associated with progressive brain injury in those who receive the treatment for many years. For many patients with kidney failure awaiting a kidney transplant or those not suitable for ... Read more